October 18, 2013

This Calms Me

All the drama in Washington has seriously unnerved me lately. I am out of sorts and need to calm down. So I turned off the TV and went outside for a walk around my yard.
Aromatic aster - Aster* oblongifolius 'Raydon's Favorite'
(*Symphyotrichum now, but it's hard to change)

The deep red is Itea virginica, with red berries of Aronia arbutifolia behind.
The edges of this shot are purposely blurry. This is an art shot.

This calms me. It just does.

This calms me too, every time I walk down the path and around the curve.

This is the first year the bottlebrush buckeye hedge (Aesculus parviflora) 
has turned so golden yellow in fall.

Sheffield Pink mums (Chrysanthemum, -- they didn't change this name, did they?)

Fragrant sumac (Rhus aromatica) has its best season in fall.

Another shot of the itea and the aronia berries above it. 

The west side of the house, with the gravel sitting area behind this garden border.
Do you recognize the little red tree on the left? The sourwood that I post about all the time.

Another look at the west side, with bright red salvia 'Hummingbird' in front of 
the purple Raydon's Favorite asters. 

Candy lily seedpods (Pardancanda norisii. They are very similar to blackberry lilies)

Doublefile viburnum, (V. plicatum tomentosum, 'Shasta').
It's a deep rust color that just doesn't photograph well from a distance.

Up close I can get a richer shot of the doublefile viburnum's leaves


Looking back at the house from the rear of the yard.

Rosa glauca, with no foliage left, but lots of hips.
I transplanted this from another area a few weeks ago. I hope it survives.

 View from behind the iteas. Montauk daisies (Nipponanthemum) 
are bright and cheerful next to the garnet red itea.

Thanks for taking this tour around the yard and staying with me through this post. It's all just random things I saw, no particular meaning and no significant observations, nothing to ponder. Just my garden.

My refuge.
Another art shot with a blurred frame. I like it.
 

36 comments:

  1. Your garden is a refuge of peace. It is so interesting with all the color and vibe. It is no wonder your BP subsides when you stroll around. Love your wall. This must make you feel accomplished when you look at it. Your entire garden is a work of art.

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    1. Lisa, thanks, it really is a refuge and the only thing that brings my blood pressure down.

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    1. Cristy, thank you! This aster has fragrant foliage that smells spicy and old fashioned when you touch it.

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  3. Your pictures don't do it justice. So beautiful up close and personal!

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    1. Gail, I am so glad you saw the real garden. It is the hardest thing to capture in a picture what I see out there.

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  4. Thanks for sharing your refuge - was needed today.

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    1. Becky, Good, I am glad it gave you a little bit of calm for a moment.

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  5. You read my mind. I was thinking of doing a wordless post called "Why I Garden," with a picture of DC. Now I don't have to. Gardening, petting the dog, and playing piano are how I tune out.

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    1. Sarah, tuning out the news has been very hard for me to do. I need to make myself go outside to get any respite. I wish I could play piano. . .

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  6. I feel calmer just looking at your pictures. Thanks for sharing. And I'm going to look into that aster - it looks beautiful and not as leggy as my October Skies.

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    1. Kathryn, Raydon's Favorite aster is a nice tidy shape, but it can get a little sprawly as all asters do. Not tall and leggy, though. I love touching the fragrant leaves. They have what I can only describe as an "old fashioned" scent.

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  7. I don't even pretend to understand American politics. The whole crisis has seemed theatrical from afar, but up close, I am sure there are lots of people hurting.
    Your garden just gets more and more beautiful Laurrie. The blue aster and all the colored foliage is just lovely.

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    1. Jennifer, I don't understand American politics either. I really don't. I do understand (mostly) my garden so that's where I go for respite, and it helps.

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  8. I calmed down just viewing your photographs. :) I also like to walk around the garden - it gives me peace, and I miss it on those days I can't seem to get out there. The problem with the way they "settle" things in politics now is that they (and us, I suppose) get to go through it all over again in just a few months!

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    1. Holley, When we have to go through this all again in a few months, I hope my garden will be ready for me! It will be winter, though, and I'll be wandering around out there in the snow : )

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  9. I totally understand where you're at with this. My husband was furloughed for the first four days and then deemed 'necessary' and told to go back to work. However, the vast majority of the people here in northern VA work for the government and we were wondering how long it would last and if we'd get back pay. I told my students that the best analogy I could come up with was to imagine two giant babies each in a corner throwing toys and calling names with the country and their parents caught in the middle. It's been incredibly stressful. Working in my garden has been a theraputic diversion.

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    1. Tammy, it must be hard to explain all this to young people. How awful that your family and the other gov't workers were used like pawns. If your garden is therapeutic, get out there as often as you can!

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  10. Gardens, including your beautiful fall showplace, are earning their keep these days, aren't they – working overtime as places of peace, refuge, plain ol' common sense and constancy. These qualities have gone missing in our national government, making America an object of ridicule around the world. Keep calm alive, Laurrie.

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    1. Lee, we are an object of ridicule and of bafflement around the world. And I am baffled too. But I go outside, I walk around . . . it helps.

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  11. I too have been stressed out and nature also saves my sould..need to spend some meditation time in the hammock

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    1. Sharon, that is the one thing I really need -- a hammock.

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  12. This would calm me too! If only you lived more near so that I could come over for a stroll! Just gorgeous friend! I can not even pick my favorite shot because every angle of your garden is stunning! And the fall color is perfect!

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    1. Nicole, that's the beauty of blogs -- people from far away can "come over" and stroll virtually in each other's gardens. It's a great way to visit.

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  13. Your fall garden is lovely. One of the most calming things to do is to just walk in the garden which I try to practice daily if even for just a few minutes. We are neighbors- I am located on the south shore of Long Island!

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    1. Lee, welcome -- and I'm glad to meet another gardener from this part of the world, especially at this time of year when our fall gardens outshine all others in my opinion!

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  14. Your beautiful garden calms me, too! I love walking in a gorgeous garden. Yours has so much character. I especially love your itea! I have one, and it is turning gold; maybe it will pick up some of the garnet color as autumn advances.

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    1. Deb, in the past other commenters have said that itea has variable (or no) fall color, but mine has been reliably deep red each autumn. I hope yours colors up well, it really is a pretty plant.

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  15. A reminder to breathe deep as I read through your post. Thank you :)

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    1. Cat, a deep breath and a walk around are all it takes sometimes.

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  16. Everything is so beautiful, Laurrie! And the fall color is just gorgeous. Politics just makes my blood pressure rise. As I've often told a friend who gets all stirred up by it, I'm not sticking my head in the sand, just my hands in the dirt. A little garden therapy is the best antidote to stress, I've found.

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    1. Rose, I like that -- hands in the dirt, instead of head in the sand!

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  17. Maybe you should start offering garden tours for those irritated by the drama of our government. I feel calmer just by looking at pictures of it. :)

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    1. Heather, I think keeping a garden should be mandatory for all members of Congress. It might work to cool things off there.

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  18. These shots of your fall garden are gorgeous. Not only is your garden beautiful but you always have fabulous fall color.

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    1. Sweetbay, some years are better than others for fall color here, and after two poor seasons last year and the year before, this fall is so colorful!

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