June 12, 2013

June is for Roses

Simple red carpet roses in June. Nothing better. I thought they were low ground cover roses ("carpet"?) and planted them under taller things, but they are three feet high and wanting to grow bigger.


Oddly colored redleaf rose (Rosa glauca). The foliage is blue, or gray, and the form is spindly. It needs something around it rather than sitting alone as such a strange specimen.


Knockout rose 'Blushing Pink'. Carefree, easy, and it's even fragrant in a very delicate, surprising way. It is right by the front door. You can't miss it when you come to see me.


Finally, a Red Drift rose makes a little pop of color at the edge of the garden. It stays low and tidy and kind of bun shaped. Despite its little size, you just can't miss it from afar.

These are all the roses I have. I am no rose grower. None of mine make any fuss or take any care or even get noticed by me for most of the year. I'm no fan. But when June comes they make even a non rose grower like me stop and appreciate their whole reason for being.

June is for roses.


32 comments:

  1. Love the little red drift rose! My carpet roses get that tall, too. Taller, even - I've had to cut them back down a few times. I love roses that are care free and easy. Yours look very happy.

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    1. Thanks, Holley -- you are a real rose grower, so I am flattered that you think mine look good : )

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  2. I absolutely LOVE Rosa glauca, but agree, unless it's coppiced in the spring, it needs something to cover it's bare legs.

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    1. Scott, I am struggling with what to do with my rosa glauca. It can look so interesting surrounded by other things, but where I have it planted, it just looks odd. I need to rethink the area it is in.

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  3. Oh yes, these are my kind of roses. I would love to find Rosa Glauca. I love it's gray green foliage.

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    1. Lisa, I like rosa glauca's gray foliage in certain lights, but in other lights it is weird. I need to put it in a different spot and surround it with complementary colors -- not sure what to do!

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  4. I grow absolutely no roses, but I've been considering the Rosa glauca. It sounds like I'll have to put some thought into its companions though.

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    1. Alison, I'll be interested to see how you plant rosa glauca -- I'm looking for inspiration on what to do with my ill-sited one!

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  5. I have the same red carpet rose and it is a monster right know and still spreading. I spec them at client's gardens because they are disease free, but they need their space. Prickly little suckers too. They get me every time I am gardening around them. I spec a lot of Knockouts too. They are much more behaved.

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    1. Donna, who knew red carpet rose would get so big? Eeep. And you are right, they do have thorns. Mine is placed right along the curve of a walkway, and it is a hazard.

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  6. I am growing fewer roses as they are constantly being bothered by aphids and beetles. I have always liked the red leaved rose but do not own one.

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    1. Patty, I can't deal with the aphids or beetles, so these no-care roses are fine for me. You should consider a rosa glauca -- it would be fun in your garden!

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  7. Roses have been growing on me, so to speak. I had none for a long time and then, as if more by instinct than conscious desire, I started to plant them. I have a white shrub rose and a white rambler. Also two wild roses: Illinois rose and Carolina rose, though the Carolina rose may be removed in the near future.

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    1. Jason, roses kind of grew on me too -- ha! I didn't want to plant any at all, but here I am with four different ones. They are easy to care for, so they stay!

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  8. I love Rosa glauca so much. Nan Ondra mentioned once that Amsonia hubrichtii does well to hide the legs of roses, though I don't know if it would work in this situation.

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    1. Heather, Nan usually is a master at combining plants, but it seems the fine foliage of A. hubrichtii would be too similar to the small foliage of the rosa glauca. But the big bushy form would work well, and the color contrast would be great. It definitely needs something under or around it.

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  9. Hi Laurrie....I bought some red Carpet Roses and thought the same thing as you....low to the ground. But no..as you said, they are getting tall, but at least they are also getting wider! Luckily they are fine where I planted them!

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    1. Christy, I guess carpet roses are not low growers at all --- not what I expected, but they are easy and pretty so they will stay even though they're too big for where I have them!

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  10. Your roses are lovely, especially the pink knockout. I've had my eye on that for a while but refuse to buy it after my red double knockout died. Yes, you heard right. It got Rose Rosette Disease and I had to dispose of it. Now I'm paranoid and refuse to plant any. I'm starting to think my soil hates me.

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    1. Sarah, how on earth did you lose a knockout rose? I guess it can and does happen : ) That's really too bad. I hope you try another one, maybe in a different spot?

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  11. I plant only the workhorse type roses. I value them for their landscape appeal rather than their individual blooms, though some do have charming if not spectacular flowers. Knockout roses are worth all the praise they get from non rosarians. Mine bloom ten out of twelve months!

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    1. Deb, I can't even imagine having 10 months of roses!!

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  12. Laurrie,
    I love 'Blushing Pink' especially you say it is carefree.
    Nice shape of bush and color!

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    1. Nadezda, Blushing Pink is the best bloomer and nicest shape of all the knockout roses that I have seen. (There is a yellow one I would like to try too).

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  13. Due to a lack of full sun, I don't grow many roses. Love the Knockouts but mine get a bad case of rose sawfly damage on the first flush of foliage even when I spray them with an insecticidal soap (Safer). Maybe I'm not applying it early enough.

    Another rose that has done well for me I Oso Easy Paprika. Like your groundcover roses though, it's supposed to be low and this year I bet it's up to four feet despite a drastic spring haircut.

    I tried Rosa glauca years ago and it became very diseased. Is it usually clean?

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    1. Sue, I have read about the Oso Easy roses being beautiful and carefree, and might try one of those. Good to know that they are not low growers, though.

      Rosa glauca is new for me, I just planted it last year, and so far have not had any disease issues. Here's hoping it stays that way.

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  14. My last carpet rose grew to be three feet high, too! That's some tall carpet! I'm glad the new easy-grow roses have been introduced. They make growing roses less intimidating and more accessible. Love your big pink one. :o)

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    1. Tammy, I know, "carpet" should naturally be a low grower. Not three or four feet hight. The one that I should have put in the spot where the carpet rose is planted is Drift. That one really is just a foot hight and tightly shaped.

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  15. I love easy growing roses like a fairy rose which I have to whack back throughout the seasons...

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    1. Donna, easy growing roses are the only way to go!

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  16. Love that blushing pink rose! Have you tried any Oso Easy roses? They live up to their name while giving constant bloom.

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    1. Joene, I haven't tried the Oso Easy roses, but they intrigue me. Karla at Gardendaze has done a profile of the Oso Easy varieties that she is trialing and she gives rave reviews.

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