May 29, 2013

Scene Stealer

She steals the show in May.

Consistently a scene grabber.

Never an off year. It doesn't matter if we have a dry spring, cool start to the season, horrible storms, or too much sun.

She blooms like clockwork and in perfect symmetry.

And for a long time, weeks and weeks.

She is never bothered by pests or any kind of leaf problem. Her confidence radiates, and no hungry bug or errant spore would dare approach.

Even though I have lots going on in the late May garden, every time I look around, I see her. She is elegant and delicate, but demands notice.


Even when Jim goes out to take a picture of other things in the garden, there she is in the shot, calling out to be noticed.

Hey guys, over here, in the distance. Scene stealer.

Viburnum plicatum tomentosum 'Shasta'.

Doublefile viburnum, or, as we say because it looks like white icing on horizontal tiers, --- the Wedding Cake shrub.


 

35 comments:

  1. Scene stealer, indeed. One of my favorites this time of year in my used-to-be Connecticut garden. You remind me I need to look around and see how it fares here in the Peach State.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee, thanks. I'm sure doublefile viburnum would do well in Georgia, it's pretty easy going about conditions. I know you will not be duplicating your old garden in the new place, so it will be interesting to see what shrubs and plants you do choose.

      Delete
  2. This is one of the most beautiful spring flowering shrubs, and one of my favorites.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. New Hampshire Gardener. My favorite too, in case you couldn't tell!

      Delete
  3. Wedding cake shrub is a perfect name. You make me wish I'd gotten 'Shasta' instead of the regular species, because the horizontal aspects of the flowers aren't as striking as the one you have. (Still, I've been very impressed with its overall toughness and performance.) Yours is gorgeous and a scene stiller indeed!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. whoops meant to say stealer. :)

      Delete
    2. Sweetbay, I have seen other doublefile viburnums around town and while they have somewhat reaching branches, none are as horizontal and wedding-cakey as mine. So they may be the species that I am seeing around. Shasta seems to have the nicest form I think. Still a stealer!

      Delete
  4. Ditto. One of my absolute favorite shrubs. I don't have room for it, but I'm impatiently waiting for something to die so I can replace it with Doublefile Virburnum.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sarah, I know that feeling --- waiting for something to go belly up to justify in planting something I have always wanted. I say life is short and you should take out something and put in a double file viburnum : )

      Delete
  5. How I've wanted a successful doublefile viburnum of some variety for years... Shasta would wonderfully fit the bill! The problem is rabbits and I've tried often but as these plants gain dimension, they are hard to protect... I've lost another this past winter... your's is spectacular! Larry

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Larry, that is so frustrating about the rabbits. They have never touched this plant, or a second one that is just a few inches high that I recently planted. Rabbits are seen all over the two beds where my doublefiles are -- but they do not touch them. You got the wrong kind of rabbits out there!

      Delete
  6. She is worth stealing the scene, look at those layers and layers of fluffy white flowers, add to that: no fuss, guaranteed performer, long blooming...she's a real garden gem!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Beautiful! I am asking myself why I don't have one, and why I can't think of any I have seen in my area. Is it possible it is not hardy in zone 5? Anyhow, as I say, it makes my viburnums (trilobum, prunifolium) rather plain by comparison.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jason, according to Missouri Botanical, doublefile viburnum is hardy to zone 5. When they are not in flower the species, which is not so horizontally branched, can fade into the background, so you need to spot them in flower. I also grow V. prunifolium and love it for its twiggy tree shape -- it's a favorite too.

      Delete
  8. Oh My, she sure is! I love this shrub, but right now don't have room for one. There are so many great shrubs and trees that I'd like to grow! Even when I finally get a new bed put in the front, I still won't have room for all the great plants I'd like to grow there. I've got that space planted a few times over in my mind.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alison, I do the same thing -- mentally I try to grow multiple plants all in one new design, then have to settle for just a few of the items I want. We always seem to need more acreage for all the ideas.

      Delete
  9. Hi Laurrie....You are so right...what a beauty and she knows it!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Christy, thanks. A beauty indeed, and just a little arrogant about it : )

      Delete
  10. Laurrie, what a beauty! I thought it's a spirea, that I have in my garden.
    Have a nice day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nadezda, this viburnum has all the showy white flowery look of a big bridal wreath spirea, but it is much more structured. Spireas and viburnums are both showstoppers, though.

      Delete
  11. Definitely a beautiful drama queen! I don't grow 'Shasta' but my 'Summer Snowflake' is quite the scene stealer right now as well. Just this morning I made a mental not to get out and take some pictures.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sue, a drama queen for sure. I've heard good things about the nice size and easy care of Summer Snowflake. I'll look for your pictures!

      Delete
  12. Replies
    1. Heather, thanks. You know that's what I'm going for -- perfection in all things : )

      Delete
  13. I love doublefiles, partly because of that bug free, guaranteed bloom, berries the birds love, good fall colour; and also because I am cheap: it is extremely easy to get rooted cuttings off of branches that can be pinned to the ground. One shrub makes two makes three makes...hedge!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Acair Fearann, you are right -- they root very easily. I have a second one that I am growing from a rooted branch that I cut off a doublefile at a friend's house, and stuck in gravel. It took easily and is now planted in my garden and growing well.

      Delete
  14. She is lovely. Probably a prima donna? Never mind, she sounds like someone you can count on and that's saying something!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Patty, I do count on this shrub, no matter what the conditions are. She is reliable and beautiful!

      Delete
  15. She has got that special something for sure!! Your eye is just drawn to those blooms! Amazing simply amazing! And your border in that shot looks pretty amazing too!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nicole, I find myself looking over to the spot in the garden where this viburnum is all the time. Can't help myself!

      Delete
  16. This is one of the first shrubs I ever planted. I added them to a sloped part of our garden in SC to help control erosion. They were beautiful and I looked forward to seeing them bloom every spring. The next owners cut them down and left the spot bare. So bizarre! 'Shasta' looks perfect in your garden. :o) She's a beauty without being a diva - nice combo!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tammy, how could the new owners rip out such a pretty shrub? Beyond comprehension!

      Delete
  17. Lovely shrub although I have to protect any until they are quite large from rabbits here...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Donna, you are the second commenter to say that rabbits go after your doublefile viburnum. I have never had a nibble, and I certainly saw bunnies in the garden when the plant was small. Not touched. I have a second rooted cutting of a doublefile growing in another garden, and it is only 10 inches high, but completely ignored by the rabbits here. Go figure.

      Delete

Sorry about requiring code verification -- I experimented with turning it off to make commenting easier, and I got too much spam. Thanks for taking the time to comment, and to type in silly codes. I appreciate hearing from you.