February 22, 2013

Bursts of Light

Earlier this month there was a meteor that crashed into a lake in Russia and the sonic boom broke windows and injured hundreds in a city near the impact. It streaked across the sky in a burst of light, trailing a white plume. Incredible.

Then a few mornings later, the first thing I saw as my eyes opened was a streaking plume of light in the dawn sky.

Of course it was the contrail of an airplane, and I knew it, but I awoke with a shock, a little panicked after seeing those news videos of the meteor blazing across the early morning Russian sky.

On winter mornings I lie in bed watching vapor trails meet the morning sun.

There is quite a view of the sky from our large bedroom windows, and early morning is a very busy time for air traffic here.

I live exactly halfway between Boston and New York, right below one of the busiest air corridors in America.  Flights are headed to both those cities, and flights are coming from Europe, headed west into the interior cities and beyond. Flights going east on their way to Europe cross over my house, and then local air traffic lumbers by, smaller aircraft going past the window with the backlit plumy vapor trails of transatlantic planes behind them.

If the sun is just rising and it is a clear day, there are six or seven pink tinted plumes crossing each other all over the sky, headed every which way. What a way to greet the day.

Finally, I get up, open the bedroom door to the living room and see the burst of yellow light from the still blooming forsythia branches that I brought in to force back on January 31.



It's been 23 days now, and all the other branches that I cut and brought into the house have opened, bloomed, entertained me for a while and are now gone.

But the forsythia blooms on. Not a single little blossom has shriveled, no yellow petal has been lost. It goes on and on, a burst of never ending sunshine. It may still be abloom at Easter, maybe even Memorial Day.

You know, it's pretty exciting around here at dawn on a winter morning.

 

32 comments:

  1. Hi Laurrie! I love all the light in your room! There's something about the sun streaming in through the windows that just makes me happy! The forsythia is beautiful!

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    1. Christy, Thanks. The whole room is almost blinding on a sunny morning!

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  2. I saw the video clips of the Russia meteor and wondered what people on the ground must have thought when they saw it streaking through the sky. It certainly must have been frightening.
    I have noticed that forsythia seems to be the forced branch of choice for many commercial flower growers. I am sure its long life in a vase is a good part of its appeal. Your forced forsythia branches are such a sunny, happy color!

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    1. Jennifer, Can you imagine that meteor coming out of nowhere and the panic? Wow. The forsythia is almost plastic looking, it is so well preserved after all these weeks in the vase.

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  3. Dawn always seems the best time of the day, when there's no traffic on the road or in your mind, leaving room for simple pleasures like persistent forsythia blooms. Enjoy the excitement, Laurrie.

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    1. Lee, dawn is my favorite time of day -- the possibilities for the whole day ahead are still endless, and the quiet and stillness is beautiful.

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  4. I'll take the forsythia over the airplane trail any day of the week.

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    1. Sarah, the forsythia is certainly brighter and sunnier, but the contrails in the sky have their beauty and mystery!

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  5. That is a sure way to wake you up! The forsythia is still so outstanding!! How nice to have beauty inside like this until we can get it outside!!!

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    1. Nicole, the forsythia certainly brightens up my indoor winter scene, not just on a sunny day, but in all weather --- especially with another snowstorm coming tomorrow.

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  6. That meteor in Russia was amazing...sort of a wake-up call! Love the Forsythia...they just shout "springtime"!

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    1. Scott, the meteor was the most amazing thing, and boy did I think the contrail over my house was another one! Forsythias do shout. Nothing subtle there.

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  7. I followed your lead and purchased some forsythia branches at the grocery store. They were the next $12 I've spent in a long time.

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    1. Heather, it's a happy thing when a cheap purchase pays back so handsomely : )

      (PS, thanks to you I am painting the blah white door from the garage to my laundry room black. I am going to love it. All because I read your blog)

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  8. I sleep within two feet of an 8 foot glass door and I see the most amazing things in the night... it's been falling stars this week, snow covered trees in the moonlight, rabbits and other critters... and in the spring and summer the sunrises are fantastic... Larry

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    1. Larry, When I was working I wanted the shades drawn tight so I could get as much sleep as possible. Now that I'm retired and don't have to get up, I enjoy the open nighttime and dawn views like you do -- and it pretty amazing what can be seen out there!

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  9. Seeing these golden blossoms in the morning light would make your heart go pitty patter. What an uplifting scene. Ahhhh.... I need to get out there and start snipping.

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    1. Lisa, If you go out and snip, get some forsythia. All the other branches I brought in were nice, but brief. Nothing compares to forced forsythia in winter!

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  10. Lovely forsythia! Happy weekend!

    Satu from Finland

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    1. Satu, thanks for stopping by to enjoy some sunny forsythia!

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  11. Laurrie, I love forsythia and it grows in my garden too, but it blooms late and short time. The meteorite that fell in Urals has shocked all of us. Never thought the big galactic body could fall on the Earth. Terrible!

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    1. Nadezda, the meteor in the Urals was astonishing to me. How could such a thing happen? But it does happen more often than we realize, all over the earth, but usually not anywhere that we notice.

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  12. I just heard on the radio about the meteor near Chelyabinsk. Amazing story! We have some forsythia as well, after seeing your photo I've resolved to cut some this weekend and bring it inside to force.

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    1. Jason, We are all amazed at the meteor crashing to earth. If you have forsythia in your garden, go out and snip off a few branches, it's a real reward. You'll be glad.

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  13. The forsythia is really amazing. I hope mine blooms that well. I'm just getting a few flowers on the cuttings.

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    1. Gardener on Sherlock, last year for some reason I only got a few flowers on branches I brought in, but this year it's a different story. Timing? Weather when I cut the branches? Dunno. You should try again and bring a new batch of branches in!

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  14. Every year I see forsythia blooms on other peoples blogs and think, I need to get one of those. I'm determined now - this is the year I plant a forsythia! (by the way, I adore the yellow walls)

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    1. Marguerite, If you plant a forsythia give it lots of room and put it at a distance -- the reason a lot of people don't like them is that they were planted too close and are too crowded in many landscapes. But from a distance I do love a bright forsythia outside!

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  15. Great way to greet the mornings. I envy you. Forsythia? Not for me. I like the tiny, light yellow stars of Lindera benzoin (wonder if it can be forced?).

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    1. James, you are not alone in your feeling about forsythia. I am sure lindera benzoin can be forced -- after this weekend's snowstorm I might go cut a few of mine to see. I did cut branches from a cornus mas, the yellow corneliacherry, and it bloomed inside with delicate lemony yellow flowers. Much more subtle than the forsythia! But briefer.

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  16. My students and I were fascinated with the meteor story and followed it throughout the day. Exciting but scary! I think I killed a forsythia once. I didn't even think that was possible. I love your forced branches. :o)

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    1. Tammy, it is utterly impossible to kill forsythia, so I can only assume it left of its own will, not wanting to be in your garden for some reason : )

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