October 14, 2012

The Pictures I Promised

When I wrote about Oxydendrum arboreum -- my little sourwood -- earlier this month, I promised I would post a picture of it when the leaves turned scarlet in mid October.

Here you go.
 (Ignore the green plastic mesh sleeve around the trunk of the sourwood.  It is there to deter bucks from rubbing their antlers on the bark this time of year.  They do quite a lot of damage to small tree trunks.)

Jim braved threatening clouds to take these photos on a stormy looking day. He is my hero.

(It never rained, but the skies were ominous)

It's a little chilly sitting in the chairs in the gravel garden now.  But even on a cool day I could rest here all afternoon and marvel at how trees change color, how they grow and how my garden is evolving.

(The bright orange nasturtiums have succumbed to a killing frost since this picture -- they froze to mush,
leaving a strong scent of pepper throughout the whole area.  And the red salvia blackened. Sigh.)

Do you do that? Do you rest, look, marvel, and shake your head at what you have created around you? I hope so.

And, because it is autumn in New England, you have to look at a maple leaf.  You just do.


Happy October to you.  Happy spring to the gardeners in the southern hemisphere, and happy autumn to the gardeners staring down winter up here.

We got a hard freeze this weekend.  It's coming.
 

30 comments:

  1. What a beautiful sight this tree brings to your garden in October. No wonder you sit out there staring at it and your surrounds. I do sit out and wonder some. I always end up doing something it seems. We have had some hard frosts turning all the hostas yellow. The wind is ushering in some really cold weathers today so they say. Have a great week.

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    1. Lisa, It's difficult to just sit and not feel the need to do something, isn't it!

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  2. No wonder you love this tree so much, Laurrie--it is beautiful! In fact, I'm thinking I'd love to sit on those chairs and just enjoy the lovely scene you've created. I do sit quite often and marvel at the changes in my own garden, but then my mind always wanders to what I should and could do to improve it. Not that I jump up and immediately start working on that, mind you; I just think about it a lot:)

    Time to enjoy this beautiful fall as long as it lasts!

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    1. Rose, that's what sitting in a garden is for --- thinking. Not necessarily doing, just pondering what needs doing!

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  3. That photo with the dark sky and your sourwood is amazing! I enjoy painting pictures of dark skies and contrasting trees...this one takes the cake! It must be hard to keep the wildlife in check. Have you written a post about this topic? I am always looking for tips as we have some serious issues with our critters. Your garden still looks so vibrant!!! We haven't had a hard freeze yet here in Chicago but I am sure one is right around the corner. Have a wonderful weekend!

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    1. Nicole, the wildlife is a challenge here-- the deer are the worst, and my only tips are to spray, spray early, wrap new plants and trees in mesh protectors, and spray often. New plantings are the most vulnerable, deer will sample any and all plants that have just been planted. After a couple years, as the plants mature, they eat less of them. You must have a deer problem where you are too!

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  4. Thanks so much for the picture of the turning maple leaf! They are so pretty, and I miss them. The sourwood is showing off some very pretty color too. Sitting in the garden is one of my favorite things to do, but I really don't do it often enough. But I do go around the garden at least once a day and make note of what looks great, and what needs work. Maybe not quite the same restful pastime, but it does give me time to admire. We haven't had a frost here yet in the Seattle area, but fall rains have returned finally.

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    1. Alison, I am so glad I could give you your New England nostalgia fix with just a picture of a maple leaf. This is the time of year that it is hard to live anywhere else, but come winter I will envy you : )

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  5. A beautiful tree in a beautiful setting-how much better can it get?

    Yes, I often marvel at the beauty around me. Soon I'll be marveling at how different things look after fall cleanup. All ready for the process to begin again come spring.

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    1. Sue, well, it could get better if the little sourwood would grow some! I am being patient, but this pretty tree is a pokey grower : )

      I got out and cleaned up all the freeze-killed stuff, and the garden does look so different. More to clean up, more to do!

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  6. Laurrie, I remember that post when you promised a photo. So I'm glad to see this handsome guy, so nice with dark red leaves! It's pity that I have no this plant, but if I see it I'll purchase, because it's suitable for our climate too.

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    1. Nadezda, thanks. You would love this tree in your garden!

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  7. Beautiful. And the nasturtium below look great too!

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    1. Heather, thank you. Sadly, the nasturtiums are now gone after a hard frost a few days ago. But boy did they carry on all summer and into fall.

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  8. The Sourwood is gorgeous this season, and definitely worthy of protection from the deer! The setting is wonderful. Tell Jim I appreciate his photos; the color of the tree is outstanding against the dark sky.

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    1. Deborah, Jim will like the compliment. He is getting very artsy with his photos now, and I am using more and more of his shots on this blog.

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  9. It's so beautiful I wish I had one!

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    1. Tammy, I think we can find a spot for one in your garden. We may have to amend the soil, but sourwood is a southeast native, so it will like your climate. In all your garden re-do planning, make a note that you need a sourwood somewhere : )

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  10. What a lovely little tree, set against a beautiful backdrop of larger trees and plantings. I believe I could sit a spell in this spot and marvel at the beauty :-) Might need to start a fire and have some hot chocolate if it's going to be cold, but I could definitely do some marveling here :-)

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    1. Toni, we did have fires in a portable firepit out there last winter. Wine, flames leaping, wrapped in our parkas, marveling at the bare branches and winter scenes. Then it took all week to launder the smoke smell out of our clothes and hair!

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  11. You've inspired me to plant a Sourwood somewhere in the garden. I've been sitting on the fence with my fruit trees, no time to take care of them and probably too shady for them anyhow. I love the color contrast in the one photo with stormy skies behind those incredible rich autumnal colors. Magnificent!

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    1. Rob, that is my purpose --- to inspire others to plant this! Your climate will be ideal for a sourwood. It will want mostly sun, so if you are thinking to replace the fruit trees that are in shade, make sure the sourwood isn't in too shady a spot. I hope you find a nice specimen to put in!

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  12. Our sourwoods colored up in sync, Laurrie, and the beauty is palpable. Also, thanks for that glamor shot of the maple leaf. Nothing more New England than that.

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    1. Lee, the maples just want to have their portraits taken right now!

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  13. Hi Laurrie, Your sourwood tree certainly puts on a nice autumn show. Jim did a nice job of capturing the color against the cloudy grey sky.
    I was looking through some of the photos in this and the last post when it struck me how nice and uncluttered your garden is. It really does help to make it seem serene and peaceful. I can see why you like to send time just sitting and taking it all in.

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    1. Jennifer, thanks so much for your comments about my garden. I am at the stage where I am editing more than I am adding or building, so it's nice to hear it looks uncluttered and serene!

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  14. I don't think autumn could be prettier anywhere else in the world as in eastern North America!

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  15. Laurrie, I"m so glad I'm not the only one who just sits and contemplates the garden. Sometimes I find I haven't got much work done because I've been sitting and looking for much longer than I intended. Autumn is in full swing here now and the drive into town each day is such a beautiful sight. The eastern half of North America does fall in such a spectacular way.

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    1. Marguerite, isn't this the best time to live in the north east? I'm glad to know PEI gets its share of blazing beautiful color!

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