October 18, 2012

Opening Up

'Sheffield Pink' mums open very late in the season.  They hold their buds forever, and they wait, and wait and wait until the time is just right, then they wait another day or two, and then they finally open up.










They are the only hardy mums I grow. Some years they are quite pink, other years they are rosy brown. I have clumps of them everywhere, so the apricot color repeats throughout the gardens.

'Sheffield Pink' is a muted color, so the sheer abundance of open daisy faces is soft and calming amid the riot of fall colors.


They seem to take forever to open up. When they do, it's not showy and its not flashy, but it's good.

 

30 comments:

  1. I love these, Laurrie. You've grown a powerful mass and time-lapsed it beautifully with your images. Hey, you sure have a nice combination with that unpollarded cinnamon-bark maple.

    My Sheffields were a gift, one I shrugged at until I saw them in full bloom. Now I wouldn't be without them.

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    1. Lee, thanks. These mums aren't spectacular but there is something refined and soothing about them I'm glad you have them too.

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  2. Laurrie, I think you are growing chrysanthemums? They are so pretty! I love white and pink.

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    1. Nadezda, thank you! It's a pretty shade of pink and they fit well in the garden.

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  3. I have these same mums, and they are also the only ones I grow!! Mine are near purple and blue asters, which isn't the most perfect arrangement, but it's very cheerful. I love these mums so much. So beautiful and easy. Yours look fabulous!

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    1. Tammy, Glad to hear you grow these too. They really are easy, and I have so many around the place because they are easy to root

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  4. Love Sheffies, this is one plant that I absolutely had to have an entire swath of. That picture of them with your peely tree (paperbark maple?) is (in the words of Goldilocks) just right.

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    1. Alison, yes, the tree is a paperbark maple. Now every time I walk by it I think of it as a "peely tree" -- love that!

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  5. I see these Sheffies popping up all over the blogasphere during fall. I must seek out these beauties. Yours look beautiful in those large clumps. I bet the butterflies and bees thank you for this last sip of pleasure.

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    1. Lisa, I do notice the bees all over these mums. There isn't much else for them right now, even the wild asters in the meadow have gone by, so it's nice to see them feeding on these big clumps.

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  6. I think this plant unites many of our gardens. Still, I love it much more than some of the 'common' plants.

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    1. Layanee, Sheffield Pink is in a lot of gardens and I always love to see them!

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  7. These mums have been on my wish list ever since I saw them on another blog a few years ago. Seeing how good these masses of blooms look in your garden and the lovely apricot coloring, I really need to make a resolution to find some for next year.

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    1. Rose, you'll be happy if you add them. They are easy to grow, just needing a trim back in early summer to keep them bushier.

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  8. Hi Laurrie, I have no hardy mums in the garden at the moment. It might be nice to add a pretty late bloomer like this one. The plant has an attractive open shape (unlike the tight ball mums you see so often in the fall) and the color of the flowers is very pretty.

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    1. Jennifer, the tight ball mums are the florist, or hothouse, plants that won't winter over for us. I like the more open shape too, and I like that these just keep coming back!

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  9. What a perfect color to go with the rest of autumn. You have the soul of a painter and it shows in your designs.

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    1. Barbara, oh my, the soul of a painter! Now you've got me smiling. What a compliment : )

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  10. I have to second (third? fourth?) the comments about the mums against that peeling bark. What a brilliant combination that is. I've never seen hardy mums for sale here, wish I could find some. I love mums but hate having to pay top dollar and then throw them out a month later.

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    1. Marguerite, thanks. The hardy, or garden, mums won't be for sale in the fall when the hothouse mums are. They should be available with the perennials in spring --- although now that I remember, I did have to order these mail order. I didn''t find them at the nurseries.

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  11. Your mums are beautiful! I have a similar one of a rusty salmon color that also blooms late; they are just opening this week. I don't know its name. It came from the grocery store and has spread as a ground cover underneath a crepe myrtle.

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    1. Deborah, rusty salmon is an interesting color description. It is exactly the color of these this year, although some years they are pinker. Maybe yours are Sheffield PInk, it's a very common cultivar.

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  12. Those are beautiful, Laurrie. I have no luck with mums returning. Maybe I need to search out Sheffields.

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    1. Zoey, hardy mums are actually now classified as Dendrantema, and it is only the florist mums that are still called Chrysanthemum. So look for Dendranthema --- I should get better about using their new name, and not calling them "mums" any more, which makes it sound like I am growing hothouse plants in the garden!

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  13. I need to find a spot for a patch of these beauties. Late flowering perennials generally don't do too well in my garden because the sun/shade patterns change so dramatically in late summer. Somewhere, there's a spot out there!

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    1. Sue, these are so easy to grow, that I think they would tolerate your shade patterns in late summer. If they have sun while growing earlier in the year, they'd probably flower just fine when autumn shadows creep up on them. I have a few under my maple tree and they are fine, although a little more open shaped.

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