August 31, 2012

A Place of Safety

Are you tired?  Need a rest?

The sturdy pink pom pom of a late summer zinnia is the perfect landing spot for tired flitterers and flutterers.  On a sunny afternoon, it served as a way station for butterflies, hummingbirds, and the occasional tired bee, heavy with pollen from the nearby amethyst caryopteris blooms.

It's a good place. A quiet place to sit and watch. A place of safety if you are small.

And it tastes good too. There are so many nearby flowers full of late season nectar.  But this pink zinnia is refreshing and it's right here, so why not?

This is good stuff too, but it does requite some work.

Sometimes you just have to find a flat sturdy place and take a load off.

I did not take these pictures. Jim snapped them while I was napping on the porch, resting in my own place of safety, vaguely aware of the camera clicking outside as I dozed.

Tomorrow is the first of the month, and that usually means I post a "gardening oops" along with Joene, but this time, nah. There's too much summer still going on out there and I have many more naps to take. I have mistakes to tell you about, but they'll wait.

Have a safe Labor Day weekend.

 

19 comments:

  1. Lovely late summer meditation Lucky you, the photographer works while you sleep!! Late summer, it doesn't get much better than this!

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    1. Barbara, I think late summer is my favorite time of year!

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  2. Great photo op spot. Cute that you were having your own rest while the flying visitors stopped for a rest.

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    1. Gardener on Sherlock, we were all resting at the same time --- me, the critters and the bugs.

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  3. Such a perfect and timely sentiment! The idea of needing a safe place is why all electronics with a built in camera aren't allowed in my classroom. I tell my students they can come to class and feel safe without having to worry that someone is taking a photo/video of them and uploading it to the Internet.

    I love these pictures. :o) I've noticed the importance of plants as resting spots this summer. Any flower with a flat head seems to be preferred. Maybe they serve as little landing strips.

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    1. Tammy, I would never have thought about kids taking photos in class --- how times have changed. I hope you have good classes and smart students this year!

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  4. Great shots of the little hummers bulking up for their long trip south. I'm watching one flirt with a canna out on the patio right now. Soon they will be gone :).

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    1. Sue, they are at the feeder and flitting about the plants almost all day long now. Every few minutes they visit and feed. Busy getting ready.

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  5. Either your zinnia is huge or the bird is very small!

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    1. Ruth, the hummer is such a tiny thing. It amazes me how they make their long migrations... and the butterflies too.

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  6. What an eye for the hummingbird to see red in a mass of blue. Kind of like a little convention I bear beckons. For a mare with one functioning arm, I so envy those who can capture a hummingbird. You probably have to be one step ahead of your model, I guess?

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    1. Patrick, Jim got the shots of the hummingbird just by sitting with his camera at the ready. They are such constant and frequent visitors to the zinnias and the feeder at this time of year, that you can't help but get them on film!

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  7. Your husband did a fantastic job in capturing the hummingbirds! I sat on my porch for awhile one afternoon and tried to get some photos of a pair flying about the feeder. I wound up with lots of empty sky shots and blurry blobs:)

    Love that caropteris in the first photo! I've made up my mind that if mine doesn't make it through the winter, I'm buying another next spring anyway.

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    1. Rose, the caryopteris is a favorite of mine, and the bees won't leave it alone. The hummingbird drinks from the fuzzy purple blooms occasionally too.

      Don't buy caryopteris new each year if yours don't winter over --- they are incredibly easy to root. Just take tip cuttings each year in early summer and stick them in the ground or a pot. You can plant them out later in the summer and should have at least one or two that will make it through the winter (mine typically overwinter fine). Or leave them in a pot and put them in the garage, water just enough during the winter to keep from drying out completely, then plant the potted cuttings out in spring. The plant in the pictures in this post was a broken branch that accidentally came off a caryopteris I had elsewhere --- I put it in the ground by the patio and voila, it took, much to the bee's and my delight. Easy.

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  8. I love the picture of the hummingbird sitting on the zinnia! It is surreal because that little guy is so still! Your husband got some great shots!

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    1. Garden Diaries, thanks! The little hummer was so tired, and spent a lot of time just resting on the zinnia or on the pole that holds the feeder. It;s been a long, busy summer for her!

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  9. Well, now I know where I will be spending my morning coffee breaks...here reading your blog and your garden diary site. Amazing photos....love the design ideas...and such beautiful flower beds. Our yard was horrible this year with the drought...almost embarrassing. I'm looking forward to starting again next spring. If only we didn't have winter in between. (o: So glad I visited here! (We grow sedum for a living...green roof materials)

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    1. Anita, Welcome! I have enjoyed your photos for a long time, mostly lurking. Your shots are beautiful and so creative, and I also enjoy seeing a little bit of southern Wisconsin. I am a Connecticut yankee born here, but family was from WI, and I have so many childhood memories of an uncle's dairy farm in Elkhorn and my grampa's house at Fox Lake. Here's hoping your yard and your business get some rain finally!

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