July 3, 2012

This is for Lee

In response to my last post I got great suggestions on what to do with a large resin container that was such a ridiculous purchase.  There were good ideas about what to plant in my cauldron, or even to repaint it, but the comment that captured my attention was this, from Lee May of Lee May's Gardening Life:
"I want it placed (empty) in the middle of a field of weeds or grasses or wildflowers so it looks both intentional and surprising.

Do not let it retain a place of prominence. Do not put any plant in it."

So, Lee . . . .  this is for you. 

First, sit with me on the patio and look out across the dry creekbed into the meadow.  Do you see it there at the bend of the path?
Hidden

Walk over the bridge and come with me down the path.
Discoverable

There it is, dark and unsettling in the deep shade of slightly ominous tall weeds.
Sculptural

Jim has mowed a winding labyrinth of paths throughout the meadow, and the weeds have reached a good five or six feet tall now.  They hide anyone who braves the ticks and sleeping fawns out there to walk among the grasses.

As you come around one of the curves from the other direction, it startles.
Surprising

With one short suggestion from a fellow blogger, I went from hating this pot, making fun of it, lamenting what to do with it, and regretting that I even owned it, to loving its dark, mysterious, weighty form out in the meadow.
Intentional
Lee, I owe you.

 

31 comments:

  1. Hey! I love it! What a great idea, it does look intentional, like you planned it that way all along. The color works too, possibly disappearing in the shadows, then reappearing in the light.

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    1. Julie, the minute I put in in that spot in the meadow, I knew it was right.

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  2. I love it! I love the conviction of his suggestion. :o) It will be fun to see how nature chooses to use it. I also love the surprise of it. Fabulous!

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    1. Tammy, that's what caught me too --- his instructions were so direct and assured. The result is fabulous for sure!

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  3. Lee had the perfect idea! The scale of it looks great out in the meadow and it can definitely hold its own against the weeds. Glad you're happy with it now...no more goops.

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    1. Cat, no goops! The scale is what makes this big ugly pot looks so good out in the big weeds.

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  4. Well leave it to Lee. The skills of a great writer include knowing how to write about mysterious concepts. Rather than send it to the recycle bin, Lee used the right side of his brain to envision placement and the left side to solve the mystery. Kudos to both of you - and the weeds of course.

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    1. Jon, kudos to the weeds, for sure (I do have awesome weeds). But you are right about the skills of a great writer being able to visualize, solve problems, and most importantly, articulate solutions.

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  5. I didn't get a chance to comment on your last post but now I"m glad I didn't because I thought you should repaint it. Seeing it now in the grass that colour is just right.

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    1. Marguerite, good thing Lee intervened in time . . I was set to repaint it too!

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  6. The pot saga (and Lee) have proven that the only rules in gardening are the ones you self impose. Glad you found a solution that makes you happy!

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    1. Sue, this simple move of a silly pot does make me happy. It's ridiculous, but it does : )

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  7. You and Lee make a great design team. This is the perfect setting for that overgrown pot. The paths are mown perfectly to enhance. Great job.

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    1. Lisa, Jim started mowing paths just so I could get out to water the tree seedlings on the back hill, but I am finding they are a design element in the garden too. I love wandering through the labyrinth and it gives me a way to enjoy the meadow. So I'm putting him on the design team too!

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  8. The Bardini gardens in Florence have big empty pots like this everywhere. It looks fabulous--good job you two.

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    1. Heather, you mean my garden is on a par with the great estates of Florence and the Renaissance? Now I know I'm onto something.

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  9. Wonderful, Laurrie. Absolutely perfect. Just what I envisioned. I'm delighted my suggestion worked for you, and seeing the idea up on its feet is a great way to start the day.

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    1. Lee, A big thanks for the advice and direction!

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    2. Well, your fine eye knows what works, Laurrie, so it was a team effort. How flattering to see my name in your post headline – annnd to read herograms from readers, to boot.(Many thanks, Dear Readers.) As my head bumps the ceiling, I'll quote a friend who, when told he had a good idea, would say: "It jus' come to me."

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  10. There's always a place for another container. This works nice.

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    1. Gardener on Sherlock, I think I am done buying containers for now!

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  11. Wow, this looks great, Laurrie! I never would have thought to place this pot where you have, let alone resist the urge to plant something in it. It looks mysterious here, too, especially now that it's a black cauldron; the old pink definitely wouldn't have had the same effect.

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    1. Rose, the pink color would have been unusable anywhere . . . at least the strange black color works in this new setting : )

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  12. Beautiful place, fantastic garden. I am greeting.

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    1. ZielonaMila, Thanks for visiting!

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  13. Lee had a great idea and Laurrie implemented it perfectly. I love how bloggers share.

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    1. Joene, It's funny, but now when I catch a glimpse of the pot in that location, I think of Lee... it will forever be Lee's Corner of the meadow!

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    1. Ellen, and perfection in the garden is sooo rare!

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  15. Lee's suggestion was brilliant. It's almost as though he was channeling some omniescent consciousness when he wrote that suggestion. lol

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    1. Sweetbay, it truly was a simple but brilliant solution to my dilemma of what to do with that ridiculous pot.

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