June 11, 2012

The Long and Short of June

Here are a few views of my garden in June, from up close and from a distance.

A mix of blowsy purple nepeta and bright leaved 'Worcester's Gold' caryopteris and some dark red dianthus make a nice combination in close.  I planted these randomly, and did not intend this effect, but here it is, and I like the complexity.

In this longer shot, the clumps of nepeta frame a little opening out into the sunny yard and the look is simplified and symmetrical.

My Cotinus coggyria 'Grace' is a young smokebush, trimmed back this spring so it will not flower.  No big smoky plumes of frothy flowers, I just wanted the foliage.  It has complex brown and maroon and iridescent shimmery leaves that are different colors at different times of day.

Here it is in the garden on an overcast day.  I love the contrast with the blue 'Montgomery" globe spruce.  Up close it is interesting, but from a distance in lower light it positively glows.

A little blob of red rose sits at the front of the big garden surrounded by the paper birches.  It is a 'Drift' dwarf rose, and it is remarkable for the mass of red flowers, but not all that interesting up close.  Just some red massed flowers, and they are a little bright.

Seen tucked in under the other plants, however, it is just the right note, a red punch and not too big.

And here is the longer shot of the big garden by the birches, with the Drift rose calling to us.

Close up and far away, the garden changes.  It changes in the different light from dawn to late evening.  It changes when the wind blows.  It is altered under a burden of dew or rain.

I love the complexity of seeing it in so many different ways.
 

23 comments:

  1. June is such a fabulous time in the garden, isn't it? I love the long views with the shrub border as a backdrop. Everything looks great!

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    1. Sue, In previous years May and late summer were fabulous, but June was a lull in my garden. Not so this year!

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  2. The light does change the view - from moment to moment. You have more lovely shade than I do, but I sometimes find myself taking photos of the same spot during the day because the different charms that arrive in different light.

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    1. Pat, I can never capture (in words or in photos) the complexity of light in the garden. You are so right about how the same spot changes, even without shade directly on it. I am fascinated by gardening with light and shadows, sun and shade, and all the nuances in between!

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  3. It all looks really good. Isn't Cotinus 'Grace' amazing? I planted one last month and I can't wait for it to grow in Spring. The Catmint, Caryopteris and Dianthus do look wonderful together, and I also like the wiggly coloured stakes behind them. Genius.

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    1. Lyn, thanks so much. Your Cotinus 'Grace' will wow you next spring. I hope it is where you can its different colors in different lights and conditions.

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  4. I love all your combinations of plants, Laurrie--the different colors, textures, and shapes all combine to make a lovely and eye-catching setting. I planted a smokebush last year and have noticed, too, how the foliage looks different colors in different lights.

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    1. Rose, thanks! I do like the complexity of these plants all together. I'll look to see a post with your Cotinus in it soon : )

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  5. This is as much a comment on your disappearing butterfly bush post of a couple of days ago as on this one. I see your Caryopteris so chartreuse and glowing (and healthy) in the pics above. And I see my C. Longwood blue with nary a leaf on it, and (I'm only 20 or so miles north and west of you, so very much the same winter)wonder WHAAAAAAA? What happened? This is was the most unusual winter for dying plants -- I could go around my yard wondering what happened to you? And to you? And you, Cotinus, your top half is dead. What's with that? And you, standard no-ID lilac? You too? I will say my buddleia is leafy and prolific, and did not meet the same fate as yours. A strange winter indeed. Must have been the October snow.
    lucia

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    1. Lucia, What happened, indeed! Such a strange set of conditions this year. If it makes you feel any better, I lost one of my caryopteris plants too. The 'Worcester's Gold' and a couple other standard caryopteris came back, but one other flat out died.

      I'm glad at least your butterfly bush made it through these weird garden times!

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  6. Love that view through the catmint toward the wall of trees in back. It looks very inviting.

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    1. Marguerite, thanks, I love it too!

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  7. The beauty of nature are always universal. You again proof this. Your Post is really nice.

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    1. Bristlecone Pines, thanks so much!

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  8. This is great post. Hi What is the name of 4th & 5th picture's tree. This new to me. Thank you.

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    1. Two Steps, thanks. the 4th and 5th pictures are a smokebush, or Cotinus coggyria.

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  9. The changes in the garden, morning to night, day to day, month to month, are what keep me interested and engaged. Your garden is lovely.

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    1. Layanee, thanks. The changes come so fast in June as summer alters everything quickly. The light changes and the plants grow so fast . .. can't keep up with it all.

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  10. All of the pics are phenomenal and your garden is laid out beautifully, but I can't get enough of the smokebush/spruce combo! Hot damn! I haver failed to keep smokebush alive numerous times and I am super jealous of yours. Nice!

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    1. John, thanks so much. I have only had the smokebush one season so far, but unlike all my butterfly bushes, I haven't killed it. I wonder why it doesn't like your garden?

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  11. I love your curving beds around your lawn patches. So soothing. :o) The smoke bush and blue spruce combination is wonderful!!

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    1. Tammy, Thanks. I think many of the curving beds need expansion to work better with all the lawn, but these pictures help me see how it can look when the proportion of flower borders and grass is right.

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  12. Beautiful photos -- and you're right, a garden does look different from every angle!

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