May 28, 2012

I Went to a Garden Party . . .

Next weekend I am going on a tour of six private home gardens sponsored by the garden club in a nearby town. I know, I know, you're all excited to see what wonderful photos I'll post.  I'm all excited too.

I got my tickets early and saved on the admission price.  



Do you see what is printed, nicely, at the bottom?



No cameras?  No cell phones either?  This makes garden blogging a little difficult.

I have not been on a lot of tours of private gardens, but I've been to some, and gardeners have welcomed photos.  If I went to a garden party, and memories were all I saw . . . .

Is this standard garden club protocol in your area?  If you volunteered to show off your garden on a tour would you be uncomfortable with strangers taking pictures of it?

 

28 comments:

  1. Oh, that is so unfortunate. All the tours I've been on welcome photographs. The whole purpose, IMHO, is to be inspired. My memory isn't what it used to be - I need visual reminders. I'm curious what others have to say on this topic.

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    1. Cat, I agree, the picture taking is half the fun, especially with six gardens in one day. I won't remember what I saw where without some photos.

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  2. How weird! I'm not in a garden club so I have no idea what the protocol is. I inquired about joining one but all their meetings were held during the work day with no meetings during the summer. I thought that weird, too. Too exclusive for me! It would be worth it to ask each individual homeowner if they allow photos. The worst they can say is no. Actually, to be literal, they could say worse things but they probably won't. So here's more cliched encouragement - ya don't know till ya try (ask)! They just might say yes! :o)

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    1. Tammy, I could certainly ask each individual garden host, but I feel a little put off doing that with the explicit instructions on the tickets. I am a little miffed now, and don't WANT to take photos! So there. Harrumph.

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    2. Maybe that rule was created to cater to the majority as opposed to the whole. Or maybe it was made for a highly vocal minority. I'd still ask if you decide you want to take a few photos. I'm very curious to hear how the event goes.

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  3. I just returned from the Spring Fling in Asheville and no one said not to take photos. I and some friends went to Charleston for a big garden tour and they said "NO PHOTOS". It seems that the designers didn't want their ideas 'used'. I had never heard of such a thing before that. It was a shock. I wonder why they think people like to tour gardens. It isn't like you wouldn't remember something that really struck you. You will have to take many mental notes.

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    1. Lisa, your Charleston tour experience reminds me of shopping for a bridal gown. No photos are allowed so you can't take a picture of the designer gown and give it to a seamstress to copy. Sheesh.

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  4. Love that Rick Nelson song. Un-love the idea of forbidding photos.

    I never have visited a garden whose owners prohibited pictures. Nor have I ever prohibited any tour from shooting pix. In fact, I'm always interested in knowing what visitors find image-worthy; it's the pleasure of seeing my garden through others' eyes.

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    1. Lee, I knew you would get the Ricky Nelson reference. It is interesting to hear that pictures are welcome, from someone who has opened his garden to several tours.

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  5. That's ridiculous. The only time I could think of where that would be appropriate would be if you had very narrow paths and a thousand guests expected and you didn't want people stopping traffic. But gardens are meant to be enjoyed slowly!

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    1. Heather, I can understand asking guests to refrain from using tripods... they do block the visitor flow and tripod setups can be intrusive. But cell phone cameras?

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  6. As much as I like the idea of garden clubs, I've come to the conclusion that they aren't for me. My garden has been open through Open Days and the CT Hort Society and I have never prohibited anyone from taking pictures. In fact I enjoy seeing pictures other gardeners take of my garden because they are usually from a different viewpoint.

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    1. Sue, like Lee May above, you are another gardener who values seeing your own space through others' eyes. I find that inspiring. You must have lots of tales to post about opening up for Hort Society and Open Days!

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  7. That's such a misguided policy. A lot of the enjoyment in visiting gardens comes from taking photographs and referring to them later, especially if they show exciting plant combinations you might want to try. Writing notes is an option, but if the plants aren't labelled, what could you write? I would think they will get fewer visitors if people notice the restriction before they buy their tickets. As for copying designs, it makes some sense with a wedding dress, but none at all in a garden. And it makes the designer/ tour organiser/ garden club or whoever decided on this, look mean spirited, which can't be good publicity.

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    1. Lyn, you know, I thought it was mean spirited too. The town sponsoring the tour is one of the more upscale, exclusive towns in our area and this just added to the sense of snobbery about them. In my opinion.

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    1. James, I admire your stand. Vote with the feet!

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    2. I'd take a picture just to see what they'd do. Chances are they wouldn't do anything but stand there feeling superior and peevish.

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  9. My garden club is hosting a tour this coming Saturday as well and of course photography is allowed. It is just a bit elitist and rude to refuse attendees photos. Not is the spirit of gardening at all. I would not pay for that unless it was a famous garden such as Dan Hinkley's garden, Windcliff which he uses for his business.

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    1. Layanee, I agree it is elitist, at least it comes across that way. Good luck with your tour this weekend --- I wish you good weather, nice visitors and lots of picture taking!

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  10. Laurrie,
    I've always been able to take photos during garden club tours of private gardens. If it's just the plants your photographing what difference does it make? I do not mention the actual location of the houses visited ... I think this is offering too much information ... but I do credit the photos as from gardens visited during a tour.

    If it was a garden I really wanted to see or had a feature/idea I really liked and might want to incorporate elsewhere I would ask permission or take a sketch pad and doodle.

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    1. Joene, I would not want to identify addresses (and I blanked them out in my photo above as they were printed on the ticket). A picture of a garden doesn't have to include any identifying info. I'm not sure if the photo restriction is for perceived privacy / safety or if they don't want their designs copied.

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  11. What a disappointment! I can't imagine gardeners not wanting to share; even if you weren't going to include them in a blog, I like to take photos of plants and combos I like for personal reference later. When we visited the Biltmore in Asheville, we weren't allowed to take photos inside the house, which I understand. But cameras were welcome in the garden--if it's good enough for the Biltmore, it should be anywhere!

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    1. Rose, I agree! I've never been to a public garden or a private home that restricted photos.

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  12. Very curious what their reason is for prohibiting photos. Is it safety, privacy or does it have something to do with garden blogging particularly? If they don't want photos posted on the internet they could state a policy in that regard rather than banning photos entirely.

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    1. Marguerite, I finally contacted the garden club and asked why no photos. I got a very nice response, but all they said was "It is for the homeowners' privacy", which makes no sense. These homeowners have volunteered to show their gardens, so they know people will be in their yards. And a ticket price of $20 means they will not be getting casual curiosity seekers in off the street --- the price means only dedicated gardeners will come. It still puzzles me.

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  13. How bizarre, although people do end up sharing their pictures from these garden tours and often in a fairly public way (i.e. the internet). When I take pictures at a garden tour, I rarely shoot the house, and if the house does get in the picture, I remove the house number. I often ask whether or not they want their name used. Most people are quite proud, but others prefer to be referred to only as the "homeowners". Most posted pictures of garden tours that I see online are quite similar.
    I say that, if you "open" your garden, you open it to pictures. I wouldn't go on the tour in protest.

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    1. Jennifer, it was all a moot point this past weekend, as it poured rain, and it would have been impossible to take any pictures anyway! The gardens were very nice, even in the rain, but not memorable. And I still don't understand the policy, but no matter.

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