May 17, 2012

Coincidence?

Coincidence?   I think not.

First, Lee May posts about the red buckeye tree (Aesculus pavia, or maybe A. carnea) that he gave his wife for Mother's Day one year.

It's a small tree in his garden, but it has charms, and his wife has come to really appreciate it.  I loved the photo he posted.   Such a little tree, blooming so enthusiastically.  And not in spring whites, but in deep dark red.

Then, on a garden tour in upstate New York this past weekend I see not one, but two red buckeye trees in two different gardens.  Both in bloom.  Beautiful specimens.

This can not be a coincidence.

Having first seen this tree on Lee's blog, it is now calling to me every time I go out.  Every time I enter another garden, I see it.

And you know where that leads.

I want one.
I saw this mature specimen at Mead Farm House in Amenia, NY

I also want a big red barn to show off my buckeye to its best effect. 

If I grow one I want it to be a graceful tree.  The one in the photo below is lovely, but it is still young and could be pruned up a bit I think.
I photographed this is at Margaret Roach's garden (her blog = A Way to Garden)

It seems to have its best season in spring, with gorgeous green floppy foliage and richly red spiky flowers that hummingbirds absolutely love.

In summer, this buckeye, like all buckeye trees, will get leaf scorch and really needs afternoon shade to look a little better.  Lee's tree is in the understory of nearby woods, so I think it must do well there --- I hope he will post summertime pictures of his little buckeye.

I have no woodland understory to grow this beautiful red buckeye in.  No shade for it at all.  And I have no red barn.
another view from Mead Farm House

But it cannot be simply coincidence that I am seeing this tree everywhere I go, so shortly after learning about it.  Someone wants me to plant a red flowering buckeye.

I think someone wants me to have a nice big barn too.

17 comments:

  1. When I lived in upstate NY we had a massive (think colossal) buckeye tree with white flowers. It must have been planted when the house was built - 1895. The tree and flowers were beautiful but the green spikey balls it dropped were killers. Maybe it was a chestnut tree - I don't know - but it could be lethal. Your red buckeyes look much friendlier. Do they all come with complimentary barns?? :o)

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    1. Tammy, I think all red buckeye trees should come with red barns!

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  2. He he he. this sequence of events sounds very familiar. The same thing happened to me in March with Cercis. I saw them in flower on several blogs, then I saw your photograph of the one you lost outside your spare room window, and decided I needed both the tree and a white-framed window to see it out of. That might be easier to organise than a big red barn, though!

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    1. Lyn, I hope you do locate just the right cercis and put it in front of a window. You won't be disappointed!

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  3. Laurrie, I'm happy to be your enabler. I *know* a buckeye is in your future. And, I hope you get a red barn for . . . Mother's Day.

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    1. Lee, a big red barn for Mother's Day, yes. And some country acreage to put it on!

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  4. It is happening to me as well. I planted one about 4 years ago, this is its second flowering year. Last year I missed it as I returned to Barbados by then, but this year, oooh this year, I am going to see it. In bud right now, but going to open any day now, very excited.

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    1. Deborah, I hope you get to see your gorgeous tree in bloom. So sad that you missed it last year!

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  5. Sounds like there's a new tree in your future! Very pretty thing too but somehow I thought these got bigger? I guess I'm thinking chestnut which must be different.

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    1. Marguerite, I think the red flowering buckeye is small, and it is the big Ohio buckeye, or horsechestnut that you are thinking of. Those are truly majestic sized trees with giant white flowers.

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  6. It sure seems like more than a coincidence! Surely there's a spot for one somewhere in your garden!!

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    1. Bernie, I am scoping out places to put one of these pretty trees. It is a small tree, so I just might be able to find a spot . . .

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  7. I sent you an email about how I prune the deutzia and sweetspire. :o)

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  8. I love the buckeye, and I agree you need the red barn to go with it. (Maybe a garden house, painted red, would do? Or a red garden bench?) When I am drawn to a plant, I am amazed at how suddenly I see it everywhere! Other things are like that, too. Recently I was attracted to some patio furniture for sale, but I was torn between buying the new or refurbishing the old. Then, I visited a friend and discovered she had the same kind of patio furniture I was looking at! We both agreed it was some sort of sign, so I ended up buying the new.

    About my new lightweight garden hose: I wonder if it is the same one you bought after all. I love mine, and I have not noticed any stickiness to it. It is a bit springy, but with water flowing through it, that is not a problem at all. When I am finished it coils easily back into the hose pot. Also, knowing what I paid for it, I can't imagine you throwing it away rather than getting a refund!

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    1. Deborah, I definitely need some kind of red structure if I plant a red buckeye! (The hose was beyond frustrating, and by the time I dealt with the kinking - so frustrating - it was not returnable. aaargh)

      I'm glad to hear serendipity prevailed and you got the patio set you really wanted!

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  9. Laurrie, funny ... I also began noticing red buckeye trees after Lee's post. Hope you find one you like to grace your gardens in the future.

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    1. Joene, I think I have a place to put one.... now to find a source!

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